Take the heat out of your energy bill this summer

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While the longer days and sunny skies of summer are being welcomed by many, the higher power bills that can come with keeping a house cool, won’t be.

And while summer is the season to entertain, the extra energy generated by a drinks fridge isn’t a cause to celebrate.

The best way to manage your bills this summer is to be mindful of when and how you are cooling your house, food and drinks. Set some rules and only turn the aircon on during the days when temperatures are forecast to be nasty. Also try to make conscious decisions about which appliances you use, as some cost a lot more to run than others.

Follow these tips to help reduce energy consumption and save money on your bills this summer[1]:

Keep your cool:

  • According to research by Origin, 76% of Australians set their air conditioner thermostat below 24 degrees during the summer months.[2] However, each degree lower could add between 5 and 10 per cent[3] to overall aircon energy consumption
  • Using a ceiling fan in place of a small aircon during the summer months could save you between $61 – $212 depending on which state you live in[4]
  • If you’re one of the 50% of Australians who prioritise staying cool during the summer over saving energy,[5] then at least choose to use a 5kW (two room) unit rather than a larger 12kW (whole house) system. Something as simple as this during the summer months could save you around $145 – $332 depending on where you live[6]
  • Set some ground rules for aircon use. For example, if you only turn it on during days where the mercury’s due to hit the 30°C mark as opposed to 28°C you could reduce consumption and in turn dollars
  • Close your windows, blinds and shutters on the sunny side of the house before the hot weather arrives, and seal any gaps to keep out that hot breeze

The Esky’s the limit:

  • Origin’s research found that 46% of Australians have more than one fridge plugged in and running, and nearly a quarter (24%) use their second fridge only when their main fridge is full from entertaining[7]
  • The extra fridge that you use to store the unnecessary over-flow of beverages and emergency BBQ supplies might be costing a lot more than you think. In fact, it could be costing you between $180 and $260 depending on where you live[8]
  • Why not use an esky for the short-term overflow – it won’t cost you anything other than a few cubes of ice!
  • For your main fridge, set the thermostat to between 3°C and 5°C, and the freezer to between -15°C and -18°C. Every degree lower consumes about 5 per cent more energy[9]

And, if you just aren’t managing to combat the temperatures this summer, try heading to the beach for a dip!

For more energy saving tips to keep your cool this summer, visit: http://www.originenergy.com.au/3531/Summer-tips

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[1] All data based on a three month period from 1 December 2013 – 28 February 2014. Energy cost is based on average Origin peak domestic pricing (inclusive of GST exclusive of supply charges) for Qld, Vic, SA, NSW network areas as at 1 July 2014

[2] This research was completed by Nature Research between 17 October and 26 October 2014 via an online survey and included a sample of 1,011 Australian residents that take part in Christmas celebrations, nationally representative in location, age and gender.

[3] Refer to  your Home Guide http://www.yourhome.gov.au/energy/appliances

[4] Based on running a ceiling fan for seven hours per day when average temperatures ≥ 30 °C, potential savings up to $93 in Melbourne,  $212 in Brisbane, $61 in Sydney and $189 in Adelaide

[5] This research was completed by Nature Research between 17 October and 26 October 2014 via an online survey and included a sample of 1,011 Australian residents that take part in Christmas celebrations, nationally representative in location, age and gender.

[6] Based on running each system for seven hours per day when average temperatures ≥ 30 °C, potential savings up to $145 in Melbourne, $332 in Brisbane, $95 in Sydney and $295 in Adelaide

[7] This research was completed by Nature Research between 17 October and 26 October 2014 via an online survey and included a sample of 1,011 Australian residents that take part in Christmas celebrations, nationally representative in location, age and gender.

[8] Based on running a 300W fridge 24 hours a day for 7 days a week over summer in: Adelaide – costing around $258; Melbourne – around $191; Brisbane – around $204; and Sydney – around $183.

[9] Refer to your Home Guide http://www.yourhome.gov.au/energy/appliances

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